Share this moment

mBC in Canada

In 2017, an estimated 26,300 Canadian women would be diagnosed with breast cancer.1 Of those women, about 10% will have an initial diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer (mBC) and 30% who are first diagnosed with early stage breast cancer will go on to develop mBC.2

For women living with mBC, also known as advanced or Stage IV breast cancer, the cancer has spread beyond the breast to other areas of the body, such as the lungs, liver, bones or brain.2 It may happen before or after treatment, or it may develop from reoccurring breast cancer.3 Although there have been advancements in early detection and treatment, there is still no cure.4

The 5-year relative survival of women diagnosed with mBC is 22%.4,5 However, a small but meaningful number of women may live many years after an initial diagnosis of mBC.6

But look beyond the numbers – what do you see? We see moments, great and small and all of them extraordinary. By stepping back, marvelling at the seemingly mundane and cheering the commonplace, we celebrate the women living with mBC and show them they’re not alone.

Moments Matter

For those living with mBC, each moment is special, no matter how common it may seem. Living in the now is more than a mantra – it’s essential. Here is a collection of extraordinary moments from the women who live them and family members who provide much needed support.

Women Living with mBC

Milène

Milène

Mei-Lin

Mei-Lin

Karen

Karen

Sarah

Sarah

Family Members of Those With MBC

Anne

Anne

Jeremiah

Jeremiah

mBC Resources & Support Tools

Those living with and personally affected by mBC have very different needs from those with early stage breast cancer. There are many resources and support programs available to help provide psychosocial support, a specialty in cancer care focused on understanding and treating the social, psychological, emotional, spiritual, quality of life and functional aspects of cancer.7 This whole-person approach to cancer care addresses a range of very human needs that can improve quality of life for people affected by cancer,7 including those with mBC.

When women living with mBC as well as their caregivers and families receive psychosocial support, they can experience their own extraordinary moments.

The resources listed below are meant to help address some of the everyday issues facing women living with mBC and those caregivers and families who support them.

Jenn

Canadian Breast Cancer Network

Nathalie

Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation

Shawna

Rethink Breast Cancer

References